Obama Center Community Benefits Agreement

“Recently, my insurance for this building was doubled. I don`t intend to sell it, so I now have additional costs at a time when my community is under the same financial pressure,” Campbell said. I look at the church out my window and the dynamic has changed who I see, and I ask myself the question: “Will there be room for me?” He said that on the west side of Stony Island, there are several open lots overlooking the park that should be considered sites for the center, including a University of Chicago parking lot on 60th Street just across from the proposed location and the American Taxi Service University Building, just down the street. which is being demolished. “I felt like Mayor Lightfoot and the Housing Department were going to take and optimize our BCAs and come back home, and we would work together to create a CBA that was useful to all parties,” Taylor said. “So I did my best to work with all parties, to get everyone, including the University of Chicago, to sit down at the table together to work on it. While we may disagree politically, I felt like we had to sit down for the good of the community and work out these things.┬áMaurice Cox, the city`s new head of planning and development, reaffirmed the position of former officials that the city is committed to re-directing the park`s presidential center. “As far as I`m concerned, we consider this decision to have been made,” he told the Chicago Tribune. Lightfoot said Tuesday it was “not aware” of the proposed settlement. She acknowledged, however, that it was important for the city to “respect the rights of people living in this community,” who “feel left behind by the efforts made so far.” As suggested by Aldermen Leslie Hairston (5th) and Jeanette Taylor (20), the CBA Regulation would require that 30% of residential construction be affordable when it is urban support or when there is demolition or “substantial rehabilitation”, and would give groups of tenants a right to refuse to sell collective housing. It would also make empty land available to the city for affordable housing and create a municipal trust fund that would support property tax relief and other strategies for affordable housing. Adams and Hodari want to ensure that South Side residents feel involved in their community by creating more economic opportunities for working families and promoting residential ownership. Both want to ensure that an agreement not only addresses the immediate effects of the OPC, but also looks forward to the economic future of the neighbourhoods most likely to be affected by this development push.

Adams expressed unease about the role of the CBA coalition, particularly STOP, in developing the settlement and believes there has been insufficient engagement with community members outside the coalition. Five years ago, the Obama Presidential Center (OPC) declared its home on Chicago`s South Side; it was presented as an opportunity to “revitalize” the area. Since then, we have had lively discussions within the Community on the economic impact of the Centre. In a non-binding referendum in February, nearly 90 percent of voters in four districts including parts of Jackson Park, Woodlawn and Washington Park supported a performance deal. The region`s two aldermen won elections this year with the support of a CBA, and more than 80 percent of voters in districts near the Obama Center backed a CBA in a referendum in February. Adams and Hodari are both frustrated by what they see as a real lack of community input in the writing and modification of the settlement proposal by members of the Obama CBA coalition. . . .